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The Three Cases of Personal Pronouns

05 Sep Posted by in English and Grammar | Comments

Pronouns have three cases, which is what indicates how that pronoun is related to the words that it is used with. The three cases are: nominative, possessive, and objective.

The nominative case is used when the pronoun is the subject of the sentence. The nominative form pronouns are: I, you, he/she, it, we/they.

  • She was quiet as she entered the museum.

In this sentence, the subject or thing being named by the use of a pronoun is “She” and so this would use the nominative case pronoun.

A pronoun that is in the possessive case is used to show ownership or possession of something. The possessive form pronouns are: My, mine, our(s), his/her(s), their, its, and yours.

  • My car wouldn’t start because I left the headlights on.

In this sentence, “My” is showing who’s car is being discussed, and the “I,” being the subject of the sentence, is there in the nominative pronoun.

A pronoun that is in the objective case is used as the direct object, indirect object, or the object of the preposition. The objective form pronouns are: Me, you, him, her, it, and them.

  • I was so thrilled that I gave her a big hug.

In this sentence, “her” is the object receiving the action in the sentence and so is a pronoun in the objective case. “I” would be in the nominative case, as the purpose of the sentence is to demonstrate something about “I,” the subject of the sentence.

 

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